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Weather in India in July – India Someday
Weather in India in July – India Someday

AN OVERVIEW OF WEATHER IN INDIA IN JULY

In July half of the year has passed and India has seen all possible climates already: from snow to heat to rain, from dryness to humidity and from cold and hot temperatures. By end of June the monsoon covers the most of the country with a thick and wet blanket of clouds and weather in India can be called nothing else but wet. From Kerala in the south to the Himalayas in the north, from Rajasthan in the west to Sikkim and Darjeeling in the east, it rains regularly and heavy in all regions. Find out more about the effects of the rain season and how it can impact your travels in this blog.

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Most locals will be still quite happy with the weather as the hot summer months are finally over and the rains provide a cooler and fresher air to breathe. Temperatures drop between 5 and 10 °C on a monthly average. Rivers, waterfalls and lakes fill up and therefore the agricultural industry becomes busy. It is a great time for farmers but also for trekking and tropical nature enthusiasts.

SOUTH INDIA IN JULY

Kerala faces slightly less heavy rain showers in July compared to June but it rains more often and long-lasting in this month. It is a great time for trekking and national park visit but we aware of the blood-sucking ledges. But if you prefer less wet holidays with lots of sun July might not be the best time to visit Kerala.

The constant rain can also cause interruptions for travels and activities. In Goa many resorts, restaurants and shacks will be closed from May to September, similarly at the beaches of Kerala. If you find a resort that stays open though you can catch great discounts on stays, even at luxury stays. And both Goa and Kerala offer lush greenery in the countryside.

If you still decide to travel despite the humid and wet weather we would recommend to concentrate on the Western Ghats, a 1600km long mountain range listed as an UNESCO World Heritage Site parallel to the coast of the Arabian sea. The region is covered with national parks, wildlife sanctuaries, forest reserves as well as charming hill stations. You can’t just find various wild and unique flora and fauna species in those hills but also endless fruit, tea and coffee plantations. And in July they offer cooler temperatures and less stuffy air than in the cities and plains of India. Wayanad, Munnar and Thekkady are such places but also the Dudhsagar Waterfall Hike in Goa. Ooty in Tamil Nadu is very popular amongst domestic tourists to flee the annoying conditions of the cities in the monsoons.

Tamil Nadu doesn’t face the entire power of the rain season in July yet as the monsoon hits this region later from August to November with the wettest month being November. But even here it can be quite cloudy and therefore cooler in July. Tamil Nadu tends to be very hot in the rest of the year (except winters) so it might be a great time to visit, especially if you come mainly for the sightseeing of temples and religious monuments.

NORTH INDIA IN JULY

By end of June and beginning of July the monsoon has also hit Rajasthan and the other central and northern regions with full power. All the popular cities of the North like Jaipur, Agra, Delhi, Varanasi, Rishikesh and Amritsar face the highest precipitation and number of rainy days in July and August.

Even though the sun doesn’t shine often through the heavy clouds the temperatures just drop slightly and the humidity increases. Travelers who prefer humid heat to dry heat should come to Rajasthan now but it will leave you feeling exhausted if you are physically active.

The cooler regions at the foothills of the Himalayas seem like a good escape but don’t underestimate the power of the monsoon when it hits the mountains and cloudburst appear. The regions of Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh and Uttarkhand have experienced many such extreme weather events when suddenly a huge amount of water was dropped in very less time. In 2013 thousands of residents, tourist and pilgrims were killed near the holy temple of Kedarnath when a landslide caused by such a cloudburst came from the mountains and carried away everything in its way. Even though that happened in June, cloud bursts and landslides are more common in July so keep this in mind if you want to travel and trek in the mountains despite the rain.

If you want to escape the heat and the monsoon all together and enjoy stunning landscapes in the mountains, Ladakh or Lahual Spiti might be the best destination in India in July for you. The state in the most northern part on India in the midst of the high mountain ranges of the Himalayas offers breathtaking views and great opportunities for hikes. Ladakh is also called the cold dessert for a reason as the precipitation is very low up here. In July the temperatures are at its maximum high for this region but rarely reach higher than 30°C. But it is also the main tourist season for this part of India so be prepared that it won’t be as tourist-free as the rest of India.

The east stream of the monsoon winds hit the north east of India by beginning of June and some regions like Meghalaya get an intense amount of rain. Rather plan a visit to this region after October.

July certainly offers a rather difficult weather in India. It rains a lot, it is humid and it might get hot. The sun shines rarely and flooding and landslides are common. But while the cities might be less hospitable due to the dense infrastructure and lack of drainage systems, in the rural areas and especially the hill stations will welcome you with lush greenery and strong impressive waterfalls. . The very north of India in the Himalayas offers the best choice of travel destinations in June as the temperatures are moderate and the precipitation low.

Plan your trip to India in June with us now and we will suggest the best places to enjoy during this travel time.


Suggested Four Week Travel Routes for India
Suggested Four Week Travel Routes for India

Exploring India in four weeks!

Always wanting to visit India? The E-Visa or the Visa on arrival has made India a much simpler place to get to for travelers wanting to visit India.

They say ‘a life-time is not enough to explore all of India‘! But with so much to see, a month in India is the least time you want to spend to do it any justice. We have outlined a few month long travel routes/itineraries that you could follow when visiting India. Each outline includes an overview of the routes, the destinations, the highlights of each route, and the modes of travel.

We’ve also tried to explain the drawbacks of the tour. Compare different routes and what you should be prepared to miss out on. The suggested routes are moderate to fast paced trips. We’ve also tried to indicate a budget for each route from backpackers to luxury travelers.

Route 1 : The Classic North and South

Route: Delhi – Varanasi – Agra – Jaipur – Jaisalmer – Jodhpur – Udaipur – Mumbai – Goa – Hampi – Kerala

One of the most popular month long routes for travelers, especially with backpackers. This route has you starting in the historically rich capital. Head east to visit one of the oldest cities known to civilization. Travel west to visit the Taj Mahal, and then loop around the Desert State of Rajasthan.

You’ll get to explore cities rich in culture and character in Rajasthan (Jaipur, Jodhpur, Udaipur). You can also take part in the Camel Safari & the Desert Camp in Jaisalmer.  End the northern leg of your trip in Udaipur before taking a bus/flight to Mumbai.

Travelling in the south is more relaxing, as you’ll be travelling south along the same coast as Mumbai. Relax on the beaches in Goa. Explore the boulders and rice fields of the time-bound Hampi. Visit the beautiful state of Kerala known for its backwaters and its tea plantations.

Drawbacks

This is one of the most frequented routes by travelers wanting to visit India. If you plan on picking it, we suggest you ensure all your transport and accommodation is booked in advance.

Since all these places are popular among tourists, it’s likely you will bump into more than a few on this trip. While that isn’t always a bad thing, if you’d like to avoid the crowds we’d suggest you travel a little early (mid July – September). While the North would have great weather, the South would be wet, but beautiful.

Backpacker! Boutique! or mix and match, we can help you plan a well thought and cost effective month across India.

Cost of a four week tour across North and South India?

Backpacking, dorm beds, day and overnight trains, at the most one flight – You can do this tour in as little as 700 Euros/800 USD per head. Euros 1500/USD 1800 for comforts of a flight or two, private rooms with bathrooms, few small heritage hotels.

It can then just go upwards! you can stay night after night in gorgeous palace hotels that cost USD 500 and upwards a night. Have a chauffeur driven car and driver through most of your tour and take flights between many a bunch of destinations.

Route 2:  A glimpse of the mountains.

 

Route: Delhi – Dharamshala – Amritsar – Rishikesh – Delhi – Jaipur – Jaisalmer – Jodhpur – Udaipur – Pushkar – Agra – Varanasi

Apart from being home to a billion people, a million gods, and a lot of weird rituals, India is also home to the divine Himalayas. This is the best possible route for people who only have a month in India and want to combine their trip to India with a trek in Nepal (Everest Base Camp/ Annapoorna Mountain Pass)

Your begin this trip in Delhi, a city extremely central to some of the most prominent locations in North India. Head north to Dharamshala (the home to Dalai Lama), followed by Amritsar (known for the beautiful Golden Temple) and Rishikesh (the Yoga capital of the world, also known for its adventure sports).

Post-Rishikesh, you come back to Delhi before heading south-west, this time into Rajasthan. Start with the state’s three gems -Jaipur, Jodhpur & Udaipur – before visiting Pushkar and Agra and then taking an overnight train to Varanasi. Varanasi is quite intense, it’s one of the oldest civilizations in the world and also a great place to end your trip in India. If you’re up for an assault on the senses, you can take a bus from Varanasi into Nepal.

Drawbacks

Like the first route, this is also extremely popular among travelers, so if you decide to take it, you might want to book your train tickets in advance. It is a hectic route, so we would recommend it to active travelers.

Apart from that, this is a good route to cover three regions (the Himalayas, Rajasthan and Varanasi) in the month you have in India.

Here’s what our guests who traveled to India with us had to say

Cost of such a tour?

Again if you if you plan to backpack, take train and buses you can do the tour for as little as 600 Euros/ 700 USD per head. You would want to double your budget to travel comfortably.

Route 3 : Exploring the South

Route: Mumbai – Goa – Hampi – Mysore – Bangalore – Chennai/Pondicherry – Trichy/Thanjavur – Madurai –  Munnar – Thekkady – Alleppey – Fort Kochi – Varkala.

 

India as a country has many facets and each region can be drastically different from the last. Exploring the south alone is a full trip in itself and entirely gratifying.

You can fly into Mumbai and first head south to the beach state of Goa. Next catch a bus or train to the evergreen Hampi and then spread out across Karnataka from royal Mysore to urban Bangalore before moving south-east to Chennai. Take a long break in francophile Pondicherry or break it up with the southern spice of Trichy and Madurai. End the trip on the beach in Varkala or carry on to the stunning hill station of Munnar, and the backwaters in Alleppey.

Drawbacks

South India is a beautiful region to explore, but it is slightly more expensive compared to the north. Flying into Mumbai and staying there quite expensive and there aren’t too many budget options in the south, even though there has been a rise in the number of hostels. It’s also sometimes convenient in the south to hire a car to get from one place to another, which racks up a higher bill than buses.

Route 4: Down South, mixing it up

Route:  Mumbai – Goa – Hampi – Mysore – Wayanad – Calicut – Fort Kochi – Munnar – Thekkady – Alleppey – Varakala

This route, like the previous one, is all about exploring South India. However in this route, you will not be travelling south-east. You’ll fly into Mumbai and head south to Goa, Hampi and Mysore before crossing into Kerala and spending the rest of your days exploring God’s own country.

This route is more relaxed and moves at a slower pace than the others, giving you time to soak in the beauty of the South without dropping dead from exhaustion. Getting from Mumbai to Goa to Hampi by bus is not tough, but if you throw in a few trains and maybe a car hire, it’ll be easier.


Drawbacks 

Limited to the south alone, and includes all the same drawbacks as the previous route.

Route 5: North and North East


Route
Delhi – Bagdogra – Gangtok – Ravangla – Pelling – Namchi – Darjeeling – Kolkata – Varanasi – Khajuraho – Orchha – Agra – Jaipur – Jaisalmer – Jodhpur – Udaipur – Pushkar – Delhi

 

The Himalayas, the Taj Mahal and the serene backwaters are a few things that people associate with India, however India is also home to the divine but underrated North-east, a virtual paradise nestled in the out-flung arm of the country.

This is another route you could take, if you like going off the beaten path. Travel through Bagdodra, Gangtok, Rvangla , Pelling, Namchi and Darjeeling, then make your way west to Kolkata; one of the oldest metros in the country. From there you can catch a train to Varanasi, then move thorugh Khajuraho (known for it’s erotic temples), Orchha (the quintessential Indian town), Agra and Rajasthan, before heading back to Delhi.


Drawbacks 

Apart from being diverse, India is also simply large, you may have to take a few flights, Delhi – Badgogra , or Bagdogra – Kolkata to save time, since there is only have a month and so much to see and do in it. Travelling in the North-east could be slightly more expensive as the local transport, though very economical, is inconsistent with its timings and you may want to trade some of your other luxuries on the trip for a comfortable car ride.

Places like Khajuraho and Orchha are beautiful places to visit, make sure you’ve made travel arrangements in advance, because of the lack of options and not very great connectivity.
Don’t have a month? Here are a few two week itineraries you could follow.


E-Visa and Visa on Arrival for India
E-Visa and Visa on Arrival for India

A little background on E-Visa for India

If you’ve been thinking that it’s high time the process of getting a visa to India became smoother, you’ve been thinking right! The Indian government since June 2014, has been aggressively putting in place an e-visa system for in-bound tourists. And the good news is, we’re almost there—you’ll most likely be getting your visa online for your next visit to India. It will reduce paper work and make the whole process much easier for travellers. No more enduring long lines at embassies, convoluted verification and documentation process and other hassles!

E-Visa or Visa on Arrival for India? What is the difference?

The e-visa format being implemented resembles a Visa on arrival, but is not exactly a Visa on arrival. The applicant needs to submit their India Visa forms online, pay the necessary fees online and the applicant would be informed online if the Visa is granted or not.

You do not have to courier your passport or visit an Indian Embassy or consulate. Once your Visa is granted, which you would be notified of online, you can board your plane to India and the Visa would be stamped on your passport when you arrive in India.

While similar, it is still not exactly a Visa on arrival and it would be a lot less cumbersome than couriering your passports or having to line up outside an Indian Embassy/consulate.

Which countries can avail of e-visa for India?

Overall, we’re looking at phasing in 109 countries. New Zealand, Luxembourg, Finland, Singapore, Japan, South Korea the USA, the UK, Canada,Malaysia, France and others are likely to be on the list while Germany, Israel and Russia are under active consideration. China with its lofty promise of active tourism in India definitely makes the list, although not in phase one.

Which countries will get the facility first?

Australia, certain BRICS countries and the African region will be part of the first phase while the US, Japan and South Korea will follow up with 30 odd countries in the beginning.

Which countries cannot avail of e-visa for India?

SAARC nations and Pakistan, Iran, Iraq, Somalia, Sudan, Sri Lanka, Nigeria and Afghanistan which are on “prior reference” list are the ones that’ll have tough luck as far as e- visas are concerned.

There’s some good news for Afghan nationals though. India may open its doors for them to stay for up to 2 years on humanitarian grounds, subject to checks and balances to avoid misuse.

A brief overview of the e-visa process for India

With Electronic Travel Authorization (ETA) foreign travellers will be able to apply (through a website) for and receive online confirmation of their e – visa within 3 to 5 working days. The facility will be available for a 30 day period from your date of arrival in India onwards.

When will it go live by?

The software for e-visa system is ready and expected to be in operation at 9 international airports—Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai, Kolkata, Hyderabad, Bengaluru, Kochi, Thiruvananthapuram, and Goa by the time this year’s (2014-2015) peak tourist season arrives.

A dedicated website for the purpose of getting an e-visa is already functional. You will have to pay an additional fee to use the service. Visit https://indianvisaonline.gov.in/ to see if you can use the facility as yet.

A word to the wise

Once e-visas kick start, visa-on-arrival will become redundant. The government does believe though, that it is better to keep both options open for the convenience of travellers.

For those who like to travel to places where there aren’t too many tourists, this new development may make India a bit disappointing during season time. e-visas are expected to double India’s inbound tourism within 2 years! But if you plan in advance, choose your destinations smartly and book tickets and accommodation with good advice, you’re likely to have a great time as always.

As of late 2015, there have been some changes in the process. Learn more about them here.